UNIVERSITY of GLASGOW

The Corresponence of James McNeil Whistler
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Documents associated with: Gentle Art of Making Enemies, The
Record 1 of 181

System Number: 12979
Date: [19 July 1862][1]
Author: Frederick Buckstone[2]
Place: [London]
Recipient: William Hepworth Dixon[3]
Place: [London]
Call Number: Published
Document Type: PLfc[4]


[...] Mr. Whistler was well aware of his picture being advertised as 'The Woman in White,'[5] and was pleased with the name [...]

There was no intention, to mislead the public by the supposition that it referred to the heroine of Mr. Wilkie Collins's novel[6]; but being the figure of a female attired in white, with a white background, with which no-colour the artist has produced some original effects, the picture was called 'The Woman in White,' simply because it could not be called 'The Woman in Black,' or any other colour. [...]


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Notes:

1.  19 July 1862
Date of publication (see below).

2.  Frederick Buckstone
Frederick Buckstone (b. ca 1838), artist and secretary of the Berners Street Gallery [more].

3.  Hepworth Dixon
William Hepworth Dixon (1821-1879), editor of the Athenaeum from 1853-1869 [more]

4.  PLfc
This is an excerpt from Buckstone's letter, as published in The Athenaeum, no. 1812, 19 July 1862, p. 86. It was written in reply to JW's letter of 1 July 1862 (Whistler, James McNeill, [Letter to the Editor], The Athenaeum, no. 1810, 5 July 1862, p. 23 [GM, B.1], p. 23; reprinted in Whistler, James McNeill, The Gentle Art of Making Enemies, London and New York, 1890, p. 54 (#13149).

5.  'The Woman in White,'
Symphony in White, No. I: The White Girl (YMSM 38).

6.  Wilkie Collins's novel
See #13149 for a full discussion.