UNIVERSITY of GLASGOW

The Corresponence of James McNeil Whistler
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Documents associated with: Caldwell, John (fl. 1894-1900)
Record 10 of 15

System Number: 00505
Date: 12 March 1897
Author: John Caldwell[1]
Place: Pittsburgh
Recipient: Edward Guthrie Kennedy[2]
Place: [New York]
Repository: Glasgow University Library
Call Number: MS Whistler C6
Document Type: ALS


GEO. WESTINGHOUSE JR. PRESIDENT.
W. W. CARD, SECRETARY.
JOHN CALDWELL, TREASURER.
H. H. WESTINGHOUSE, GENERAL MANAGER.

THE WESTINGHOUSE AIR BRAKE COMPANY,
PITTSBURGH, PA.

12/3/97

TELEGRAPHIC ADDRESS,
WILMERDING, PENN'A.

My dear Mr Kennedy

I regret that I couldnt get back to 868.[3] so as to hear of your efforts to obtain a coat (without) Arms on the Heralds College - Did you try Dublin; or perhaps the N. Y Herald might supply it. You can find anything you want - and much you dont want - you know - in the Herald - Confound Whistler! why doesnt [he] just invent something like his own butterfly - in that line - you know - Has he no sense of humor at all - I could invent something myself you know if I only had a mind to - Aye there's the rub - Well I am still waiting - and am going to wait until Whistler - makes me a book plate[4].

Yours faithfully

John Caldwell


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Notes:

1.  John Caldwell
John Caldwell, Board Chairman, Carnegie Art Galleries [more].

2.  Edward Guthrie Kennedy
Edward Guthrie Kennedy (1849-1932), dealer with H. Wunderlich and Co., New York [more].

3.  868.
That is, 868 Broadway, New York, offices of H. Wunderlich and Company.

4.  book plate
On 10 November 1894 Caldwell had written to JW asking him to design for him a book plate (#00503). On 19 June 1895 Caldwell wrote to E. G. Kennedy claiming that Kenendy's brother David had secured permission from JW for the book plate project to go ahead, with a coat of arms proposed as the main feature of the design (#00504). However, Caldwell did not have a family coat of arms, and it is not thought that the project ever reached completion.