UNIVERSITY of GLASGOW

The Corresponence of James McNeil Whistler
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Documents associated with: Kohler, Mme
Record 1 of 6

System Number: 02438
Date: 5 March 1890
Author: Mrs George Köhler[1]
Place: Antwerp
Recipient: Edmund Yates[2]
Place: London
Repository: Glasgow University Library
Call Number: MS Whistler K21
Document Type: ALS


MEMORANDUM

DE
VEUVE GEO. KÖHLER,
RUE DU FAGOT, NO 6
ANVERS.

A Ed Yates Esq.
London

ANVERS,

LE 5 Mars 18890

Dear Sir

Having just received an order to print some books entitled "The gentle Art of making enemies[3]-   J McNeill Whistler as the unattached writer": with some Whistlers Stories old & new: Edited by Shirley [sic] Ford[4]. And in which I see your name mentionned [sic] giving Mr Ford permission to publish the same I should feel greatly obliged to you if you could give me some information concerning Mr Ford. whether I do well for printing the above named book, thereby executing an order amounting to about £20 to £30. Begging you to excuse my troubling you

Believe me to remain
Yours truly.

Vve Geo Köhler

[written in top left corner:] P. S. Naturally you will count this strictly private

'Hallo, Jimmy![5] What's all this? E Y.'

[p. 2] '- Spofford[6] Esq
Librarian of Congress
Washington D. C.
U S. A'


This document is protected by copyright.


Notes:

1.  Mrs George Köhler
Mme Kohler, widow of Georges Kohler, printer [more].

2.  Edmund Yates
Edmund Hodgson Yates (1831-1894), novelist, 'Atlas' columnist and editor-proprietor of the World [more].

3.  The gentle Art of making enemies
Whistler, James McNeill, The Gentle Art of Making Enemies, ed. Sheridan Ford, Paris, 1890.

4.  Ford
Sheridan Ford (1860-1922), poet, critic, politician and writer on art [more].

5.  Hallo, Jimmy!
Evidently Yates did not 'count this strictly private' as he appears to have handed it to JW. This note was added by Yates in the top right corner.

6.  Spofford
Ainsworth Rand Spofford (1825-1908), Librarian of Congress, Washington, DC [more]; the name and address was written in another hand.