UNIVERSITY of GLASGOW

The Corresponence of James McNeil Whistler

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Document associated with: Royal Institution
Record 1 of 1

System Number: 10048
Date: [October 1899/1901][1]
Author: James Guthrie[2]
Place: London
Recipient: JW
Place: [Paris?]
Repository: Tate Gallery Archives
Call Number: Lavery Collection, TGA 7245/313
Document Type: ALd


WEST HOUSE,
GLEBE PLACE,
CHELSEA. S. W.

Dear Mr Whistler

as you will see from the enclosed minutes the accounts have now been adjusted, I am glad to say that everything is now now - thanks largely to Mr Webb[3] in proper order

Our experience [p. 2] has shown that Knightsbridge is impossible and the Grafton[4] has been mooted but I need scarcely say that very full consideration will have to be given to any other project new project in should there be be further developments it will be a great advantage to have Mr Webb with us as he [has?] from the beginning - as he himself is kind enough to say he would wish likely to be -

[p. 3: three sketches[5]]


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Notes:

1.  [October 1899/1901]
Dated from the reference to W. Webb (see below).

2.  James Guthrie
James Guthrie (1859-1930), landscape and portrait painter [more], identified from the address and handwriting (see Guthrie to JW, 18 July 1899, #01871).

3.  Mr Webb
William Webb (b. ca 1851), of G. and W. Webb, lawyer [more], was appointed Honorary Solicitor to the International Society of Sculptors, Painters and Gravers in July 1899 (see J. Lavery to JW, 28 July 1899, #02350). He took post in August.

4.  Grafton
The first Exhibition of International Art, International Society of Sculptors, Painters and Gravers, London, 1898, was held at the Prince's Skating Club in Knightsbridge. They moved to the Galleries of the Royal Institute at 191 Piccadilly for the third show in 1901. The first exhibition of the privately run Grafton Gallery had opened at 8 Grafton Street on 18 February 1893. It was the venue for the annual exhibitions of the Society of Portrait Painters (to which JW contributed) for several years thereafter.

5.  three sketches
The sketches comprise two slight drawings of heads and one full length study of a male portrait, probably in Guthrie's hand.